Autor: Nancy Craig
ISBN-13: 9780199658572
Einband: Taschenbuch
Seiten: 912
Format: 274x217x43 mm
Sprache: Englisch

Molecular Biology

Principles of Genome Function
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A fresh, distinctive approach to the teaching of molecular biology. With its focus on key principles, its emphasis on the commonalities that exist between the three kingdoms of life, and its integrated coverage of experimental methods and approaches, Molecular Biology is the perfect companion to any molecular biology course.
1. Genomes and the flow of biological information ; 2. Biological molecules ; 3. The chemical basis of life ; 4. Chromosome structure and function ; 5. The cell cycle ; 6. DNA replication ; 7. Chromosome segregation ; 8. Transcription ; 9. Regulation of transcription ; 10. RNA processing ; 11. Translation ; 12. Regulation of translation ; 13. Regulatory RNAs ; 14. Protein modification and targeting ; 15. Cellular responses to DNA damage ; 16. Repair of DNA double-strand breaks and homologous recombination ; 17. Mobile DNA ; 18. Genomics and genetic variation ; 19. Tools and techniques in molecular biology
A fresh, distinctive approach to the teaching of molecular biology. With its focus on key principles, its emphasis on the commonalities that exist between the three kingdoms of life, and its integrated coverage of experimental methods and approaches, Molecular Biology is the perfect companion to any molecular biology course.
Autor: Nancy Craig, Rachel Green, Carol Greider, Gisela Storz, Cynthia Wolberger, Orna Cohen-Fix
Nancy L Craig received an A.B. in Biology and Chemistry from Bryn Mawr College in 1973 and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry in 1980 at Cornell University, where she worked on DNA repair with Jeff Roberts. She then worked on phage lambda recombination as a postdoctoral fellow with Howard Nash at the National Institutes of Health. She joined the faculty of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of California, San Francisco in 1984 and began her work on
transposable elements. She joined the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1991, where she is currently a Professor and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, as well as the recipient of the Johns Hopkins University Alumni Association Excellence in
Teaching Award. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

Orna Cohen-Fix received a B.A. from the Tel Aviv University in 1987 and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry with Zvi Livneh at the Weizmann Institute of Science in 1994. She did a post-doctoral fellowship with Doug Koshland at the Carnegie Institution of Washington in Baltimore, studying the regulation of chromosome segregation. In 1998, she moved to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases in Bethesda, where she is now a Senior Investigator. Her research
focuses on cell cycle regulation and nuclear architecture, using budding yeast and C. elegans as model organisms. She is also an Adjunct Professor at Johns Hopkins University and the Co-Director of the NIH/Johns Hopkins University Graduate Partnership Program. She is a recipient of a Presidential Early Career Award for
Scientists and Engineers, and an Association of Women in Science Mentoring Award for her work on promoting the retention of women in science.


Rachel Green received a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan in 1986 and a Ph.D. in Biological Chemistry from Harvard University in 1992, where she worked with Jack Szostak studying catalytic RNA. She then did postdoctoral work in the laboratory of Harry Noller at the University of California, Santa Cruz, studying the role played by the ribosomal RNAs in the function of the ribosome. She is currently a Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Her work continues to focus on the mechanism and regulation of translation in bacteria and eukaryotes. She is the recipient of a Johns Hopkins University School
of Medicine Graduate Teaching Award.


BIOL15BIOS

Carol Greider received a B.A. from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 1983. In 1987, she received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley, where she and her advisor, Elizabeth Blackburn, discovered telomerase. From 1988-1997, she worked in the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, before moving to The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is currently a Professor and Director of the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and her work
focuses on telomerase and the role of telomeres in cell senescence, age-related disease, and cancer. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Gairdner Foundation International Award, the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize, and the Lasker Award for Basic Medical
Research. In 2009, she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine together with Elizabeth Blackburn and Jack Szostak for the discovery of telomerase.


Gisela Storz graduated from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1984 with a B.A. in Biochemistry and received a Ph.D. in Biochemistry in 1988 from the University of California at Berkeley, where she worked for Bruce Ames. After postdoctoral fellowships with Sankar Adhya at the National Cancer Institute and Fred Ausubel at Harvard Medical School, she moved to the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Bethesda, where she is now a Senior Investigator.
Her research is focused on understanding gene regulation in response to environmental stress as well as elucidating the functions of small regulatory RNAs and very small proteins. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and National Academy of Sciences, and
received the American Society for Microbiology Eli Lilly Award.

Cynthia Wolberger received her A.B. in Physics from Cornell University in 1979 and a Ph.D. in Biophysics from Harvard University in 1987, where she worked with Stephen Harrison and Mark Ptashne on the structure of a phage repressor bound to DNA. She did postdoctoral work on eukaryotic protein-DNA complexes in the laboratory of Robert Stroud and the University of California, San Francisco and then in the laboratory of Carl Pabo at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
She joined the faculty of the Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry in 1991, where she is now a Professor. Her research focuses on the structural and biochemical mechanisms underlying transcriptional regulation and ubiquitin-mediated signalling. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the
Advancement of Science and a recipient of the Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin Award of the Protein Society.

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Autor: Nancy Craig
ISBN-13:: 9780199658572
ISBN: 0199658579
Erscheinungsjahr: 01.04.2014
Verlag: Oxford University Press
Gewicht: 2061g
Seiten: 912
Sprache: Englisch
Sonstiges: Taschenbuch, 274x217x43 mm, 550 colour